ANNOUNCEMENTS

Cardiologists Discuss One Health Approaches to Heart Disease http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/whatsnew/article.cfm?id=4139

Understanding that the health of humans, animals and the environment are all connected and may hold discoveries for each other is the foundation of One Health. A cornerstone of that approach is studying the diseases animals and humans share. One of those is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heart disease that results in thickening of the walls of the heart ventricles, interfering with the flow of blood, and leading to sometimes fatal consequences. The condition can be difficult to study in humans due to its low rate of occurrence (about 1 in 500). However, veterinarians are proving to be a much-welcomed addition to that research, for they see a condition that almost exactly resembles human HCM in approximately 10 percent of cats.

Recently, the world’s leading veterinary cardiologists, human cardiologists, cardiovascular researchers and regenerative medicine researchers gathered at the conclusion of the American College of Cardiology’s annual meeting for an exciting One Health conference. The conference, titled “Many Species, One Health: Regenerative Medicine Meets Comparative Medicine for Cardiomyopathy and Beyond,” focused on translational cardiology for cardiomyopathies.

The gathering was co-sponsored by a grant from the Clinical and Translational Science Award One Health Alliance (COHA), a group of 14 prominent national universities (including UC Davis) whose translational science centers are bridging the gap between human and veterinary medicine. Dr. Stern was a contributor to the COHA grant that funded the conference, where he presented lectures on HCM.

Dr. Joshua Stern (UC Davis), whose specialty focus is in inherited heart disease, is a leading researcher in translational studies of HCM. He has worked extensively with human medicine counterparts to advance the understanding of, and treatments for, this disease.

“Unfortunately, there has been little to no progress in advancing the treatment of HCM in humans or animals for many years,” said Dr. Stern. “We hope that these One Health collaborations, and our better understanding of this disease, can change that.”

In addition to Dr. Stern from UC Davis, the conference included faculty from several veterinary schools, including Cornell University, North Carolina State University, Tufts University, the University of Florida, the University of Illinois, and the University of Wisconsin. Human cardiologists, regenerative medicine experts, and other participants with a cardiovascular research focus attended from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the Food and Drug Administration, the Mayo Clinic, the Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Care, the NYU School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, and the University of Florida’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, Powell Gene Therapy Center, and School of Medicine.

Through the course of the two-day conference, participants engaged in presentations and discussions geared toward advancing translational cardiology, particularly in the area of cardiomyopathies. The group looks forward to continued collaborations and engaging in more One Health approaches to HCM.

March 30, 2018 The world’s leading veterinary and human cardiologists recently gathered for One Health conference.

COHA Communication/Collaboration Subcommittee Pilot Grant Report
An Inter-Professional Student Collaboration to Enhance Awareness of
One Health

With funding from COHA, we developed a One Health program for the 2018 American Medical Student Association (AMSA) Convention in collaboration with AMSA and veterinary students from the Student American Veterinary Medical Association (SAVMA). The goal of this project is to establish collaborative One Health teams to expand problem-solving perspectives and catalyze innovation.

More than 1000 medical and pre-medical students attended the AMSA Convention, which took place in Arlington, VA from March 8-11, 2018. Our large veterinary contingent included 2 faculty (Lisa Freeman, Tufts University and Carolyn Henry, University of Missouri), and 5 outstanding students (Sarah Neuser, University of Minnesota; Sam Emmerich, University of Wisconsin; Neda Othman, University of California Davis; Claire Tucker, Colorado State University; and Laura Venner, the Ohio State University) who were selected from 69 competitive entries from COHA schools!

Drs. Henry and Freeman gave One Health talks, Sarah Neuser (SAVMA President-Elect) and Perry Tsai (AMSA President) discussed ideas for future collaborative projects, and the entire group educated the medical and pre-medical students about One Health at the COHA booth in the exhibit hall. COHA was also represented by 12 posters with 5 of the authors in attendance: Dr. Mike Childress (Purdue), Chloe Stekamp-Strahm (Colorado State University), Michelle White (Cornell), Sandra Walther (University of California Davis), and Bruno Valen (pre-medical student from Duke University with a Duke/North Carolina State University project).

The COHA booth was one of the most popular booths, with a drawing for a Fitbit and a FitBark (kindly donated by Dr. Henry), and 8 therapy dogs from the Pet Partners Therapy Animal Program.

 

 

A survey of our booth visitors showed that 117 of the 131 survey takers were unaware of the One Health concept prior to visiting the booth. We are planning a follow-up survey to see if this program enlightened attendees.

We look forward to ongoing collaboration between SAVMA and AMSA, and have already been invited to return to AMSA in 2019.